Brush Farm Academy

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Our History

 

An early photo of Brush Farm House







The Brush Farm Corrective Services Academy was established in 1990 after the then NSW Department of Corrective Services purchased the Eastwood site from the NSW Department of Community Services. Prior to 1989 the Department's training function had been largely centralised at the Long Bay Correctional Complex.

The Academy draws its name from the original Brush Farm Estate which was founded in 1800 after the amalgamation of 9 soldier and ex-convict settlements. In 1807 Gregory Blaxland purchased the estate and at some time prior to 1820 built the now historic Brush Farm House - an example of Colonial Georgian architecture. Gregory Blaxland is famous for discovering a route across the Blue Mountains, in company with Lt William Lawson and William Wentworth in 1813. He is also renowned as the first viticulturalist in Australia, winning silver and gold medals for wine exported to England.

The Estate remained in the Blaxland family until 1881 and in 1894 an area of land, including the House, was leased to the NSW Government. In 1904 the NSW Government resumed 38 acres of the property and it became firstly a reformatory, then a home for orphaned and delinquent boys.

Two years after purchasing the property in 1989 CSNSW sold Brush Farm House and its immediate surrounds to City of Ryde Council and in 2007-08 the House and grounds were completely refurbished. Corrective Services NSW contributed $800,000 towards this refurbishment and currently has a 10 year lease on the upper floor of the House.

Since 2001 Corrective Services NSW has invested more than $4 million in upgrading the facilities at the Brush Farm site - including accommodation, parking and Bistro facilities. Over the years the Academy has become an integral tool in achieving CSNSW's strategic goals and represents an important link to Australia's convict past and also the future of corrections in NSW. In 2010 Brush Farm Corrective Services Academy celebrated its 20 th anniversary.

The restored Brush Farm House

Brush Farm House was a home for orphaned and delinquent boys